Foods That Reduce Inflammation

Posted by admin on March 15, 2019

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Why is reducing inflammation important?

There are two types of inflammation in the body, Acute and Chronic. Acute inflammation  is the body’s natural healing response to an injury. This inflammation is temporary and is an important part to the healing process. Chronic inflammation  is when it doesn’t shut off and starts to break down joints and tissue, causing degeneration. Chronic inflammation contributes to many common western diseases. This is the type of inflammation we want to reduce.

Here are some foods that will help reduce inflammation.

GOOD OILS – Olive Oil, Grapeseed, and Avocado oils are good choices. Cook with olive oil and ditch vegetable oil. It is also good for your heart and brain.

FISH – Salmon, Snapper, Tune, Cod, Halibut, and Bass are some of the healthiest.

HERBS – Add Basil, Thyme, and Oregano to your dishes. Curcumin, Turmeric, and Chili Pepper have compounds that fight inflammation and may reduce pain.

GARLIC – Works for swollen joints. Combine with herbs for great taste.

NUTS –Great snacks choices between meals. Walnuts, Almonds, and Hazelnuts are among the best.

ONIONS – They are great as a soup base, sautéed, raw in sandwiches, and in stir-fry. Even better they reduce inflammation, your risk of heart disease, and high cholesterol.

HIGH FIBER FOODS – These include: Vegetables, Fruit, Beans, and WHOLE grains such as Oatmeal, Bulgur, Brown Rice, Quinoa.  {Unless you have a gluten allergy.}

FRUIT – Replace processed foods for these: Apples, Blueberries, Cherries, Pineapple, Raspberries, Strawberries.

BEANS – They are packed with protein and fiber to help decrease inflammation.

AVOCADO – This fruit is rich in monounsatured fat and high in Vitamin E. These two anti-inflammatory properties are linked to reduce risk of joint damage seen in early osteoarthritis.

GREEN TEA – Also known to reduce heart disease.

CHOCOLATE – Find chocolate that is at least 70% pure cocoa is the best way to go.

SOURCE: HEALTHLINE